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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

5 edition of Leaf protein and other aspects of fodder fractionation found in the catalog.

Leaf protein and other aspects of fodder fractionation

by N. W. Pirie

  • 101 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [Eng.], New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Leaf proteins.,
  • Leaves -- Composition.,
  • Forage plants -- Composition.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementN. W. Pirie.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTP453.P7 P53
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 183 p. :
    Number of Pages183
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4569202M
    ISBN 100521219205
    LC Control Number77087387

    1. Author(s): Pirie,Norman W(Norman Wingate), Title(s): Leaf protein and its by-products in human and animal nutrition/ N.W. Pirie. Edition: 2nd ed. Country of Publication: England Publisher: Cambridge ; New York: Cambridge University Press, Trees of several species could provide palatable and nutritious fodder during drought and scarcity periods by lopping their branches (Reddy ). There are many advantages of the forages from multi-purpose tree crops (Devendra ). The leaf fodder of some trees is almost as nutritious as that of the leguminous fodder crops.

    of the stem. Therefore, if other considerations preclude removal of all the residue from a piece of land, it seems logical to remove only the most valuable and easily hydrolyzed portion, the leaf. Amino Acid Distribution of Leaf Proteins The nutritional value of leaf proteins has been found to be very high due to its balancedCited by: Abstract: A review dealing chiefly with economic aspects of leaf protein leaf protein Subject Category: Commodities and Products see more details production from lucerne and other forage forage Subject Category: Miscellaneous see more details crops. It is a short version of Paper of the ASAE, St. Joseph, Mich. , price $ A. A. by: 2.

    Leaf Protein and Its By-products in Human and Animal Nutrition. N.W. Pirie et al. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, This is an updated and extensively revised second edition of Leaf Protein and Other Aspects of Fodder Fraction, published in   Dynamin and dynamin-like proteins are GTP-binding proteins involved in vesicle trafficking. In soybean, a kD dynamin-like protein called phragmoplastin has been shown to be associated with the cell plate in dividing cells (Gu and Verma, ). Five ADL1 genes encoding dynamin-like proteins related to phragmoplastin have been identified in the completed .


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Leaf protein and other aspects of fodder fractionation by N. W. Pirie Download PDF EPUB FB2

In suitable climates, fractionating leafy material can yield more edible protein than other forms of agriculture. The book concludes with a discussion of the problems that arise when leaf protein is made and used in practice, and of the potential role of fodder fractionation in human and animal by: Leaf protein and other aspects of fodder fractionation.

[N W Pirie] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Book: All Authors / Contributors: N W Pirie.

Find more information about: ISBN: In suitable climates, fractionating leafy material can yield more edible protein than other forms of agriculture. The book concludes with a discussion of the problems that arise when leaf protein is made and used in practice, and of the potential role of fodder fractionation in human and animal nutrition.

topics: plant protein, leaves, proteins, feed crops, human nutrition, digestibility, nutritive value, animal feeding, proteine vegetale, feuille, proteine, plante Author: N.W.

Pirie. "Leaf Protein and other aspects of fodder fractionation" p (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge). *Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Bendigo C.A.E., Bendigo.

Leaf protein was discovered and characterized in by Rouelle who was demonstrator at the ‘Jardin du Roi’ in Paris. The historical background of these studies was reviewed by Pirie [ 2 ]. His pioneering work since World War II threw light on the fairly good nutritive value of leaf protein concentrate (LPC) which can be obtained quite easily from the leaves of a variety of plant sources Cited by: Figure 3B: Crude protein in green fodder, pressed crop and leaf protein concentrate (kg/hectare).

Conclusion There is a wide scope for increase in the yields of LPC from these crops, through the use of fertilizers, by adopting technique of intercropping, by harvesting the crop at a proper stage and by improving the method of the preparation of : Rajesh K Jadhav.

Leaf protein is preferable to some other novel proteins because, throughout the wetter parts of the tropics, which are the regions where protein deficiency is most acute, it could be made from local crops for local consumption without elaborate machinery.

The different physico-chemical status of such proteins requires different processes for their recovery as a whole or in fractionated bulk. Therefore, three different leaf protein concentrates (LPCs) can be obtained: cytoplasmatic (white), chloroplastic (green) and whole LPC, the last being a combination of the other by: Leaf protein concentrates can be made from many plants, including alfalfa, cereal fodder, beet tops etc.

Protein synthesis is one of the chief activities of the green part of the plant. Some forage crops produce leaf protein in large quantities of up to 5 tons per hectare - three to four times that of grain crops. Summary: This is an extensively revised second edition of N.

Pirie's much acclaimed earlier work, Leaf Protein and Other Aspects of Fodder Fractionation. The fibrous character and flavour of many leaf crops impede their use as green vegetables, and feeding them directly to animals is relatively inefficient. Leaf protein concentrates (LPC) were obtained from carrot tops, cucumber, mangold and tomato leaves, pea vines and potato haulm using a standard method.

Yields of extractable protein per hectare ranged from 45 kg (carrot) to kg (cucumber, potato, tomato). Protein contents of LPC ranged from 225% (carrot) to 50% (potato).Cited by: 4. The utilization of the products of green-crop fractionation by pigs and ruminants.

Proceedings of the Nutrition Society35 (2), DOI: /PNS J. WANG, J. KINSELLA. FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF NOVEL PROTEINS: ALFALFA LEAF by: [8] N. Pirie, Leaf protein and other aspects of fodder fractionation. London: Cambridge University Press, [9] M.

Collins, "In recent advances in leaf protein research," in Proceedings of the 2nd international Conference on Leaf Protein Research, I. Tasaki (Ed.), Nagoya and Kyoto, Japan,pp. Thiamine, riboflavin and pyridoxine were estimated from leaf protein concentrate (LCP) of twenty plants viz Adhatoda vasica, Benincasa hispida, Brassica oleracea V.

botrytis, Brassica oleracea V., Trigonella foenum graecum and Vigna mungo. source of protein, fodder legumes are also an important source of minerals such as sulphur, calcium, copper and iron even though they have been shown to be a poor source of manganese, zinc and phosphorous.

The other advantage of using fodder legumes as a source of feed for ruminant animals is that supplementation of forages up to about 35% does notFile Size: 73KB. The availability of soyabean meal for animal feed use in Asia and the Pacific is low.

The potential usefulness of a wide variety of protein-rich plant materials which could replace soyabean meal in poultry feed formulations is examined in this by: Food from the leaves of trees and bushes.

N.W. Pirie. N.W. PIRIE is with the Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Herts., UK. This article is a shortened version of an article which appeared in Appropriate Technology, London, Nov.

Grasses and other low-lying plants are the main food of domestic grazing animals in Europe and North America. Food protein sources: Food resources: conventional and novel: Four thousand million mouths; scientific humanism and the shadow of world hunger. Leaf protein and its by-products in human and animal nutrition: Leaf protein and other aspects of fodder fractionation: Leaf protein: its agronomy, preparation, quality and use.

D’Mello J P F Nutritional potentialities of fodder trees and fodder shrubs as protein sources in animal nutrition. In: Legume Trees and other Fodder Trees as Protein Source for Livestock (A Speedy and P L Pugliese, editors) FAO Animal Production and Health Paper, Rome p Gill G L Change over design: sequence of treatments.

Green crop fractionation includes Deproteinised Leaf juice as a medium for fungal growth and for production of Protease (Josephin and Sayyed. Leaf protein, a potential substitute for fishmeal and soybean meal, can be extracted from plant species hitherto rejected as unpalatable by N.W.

Pirie Although the early papers advocating large-scale extraction of leaf protein (LP) usually contained some such phrase as “for use in feeding people and other non-ruminants,” their tone showed.

Fractionation of carbohydrate and protein content of some forage feeds of ruminants for nutritive evaluation Lalatendu Keshary Das, 1 S. S. Kundu, 2 Dinesh Kumar, 3 and Chander Datt 2 1 Veterinary Dispensary, Kalampur, Kalahandi, Odisha, IndiaCited by: 3.